Cold Weather Running Gear

Discount Cold Weather Running Gear

Women’s Running Gear
  • Women’s Stretch Fit Moisture Wicking Running Skull Cap

    $14.95
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  • Women’s Sport Fleece Running Gloves

    $17.95
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  • WOMEN’S REVERSIBLE MOISTURE WICKING HEADBAND WITH PONY TAIL HOLE

    Women’s Reversible Moisture Wicking Headband with Pony Tail Hole

    $14.95
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  • Women’s Performance Active Wear Gloves

    $14.95
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  • Men's Moisture Wicking / Breathable Running Hat Black

    Moisture Wicking, Breathable Running Hat

    $12.95
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  • Moisture Wicking Micro-Fleece Running Headband

    $12.95
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  • Men's Moisture Wicking Micro-Fleece Running Sport Gloves (Black)

    Moisture Wicking Micro-Fleece Running Gloves

    $12.95
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Men’s Running Gear
  • Men's Moisture Wicking / Breathable Running Hat Black

    Moisture Wicking, Breathable Running Hat

    $12.95
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  • Moisture Wicking Micro-Fleece Running Headband

    $12.95
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  • Men's Moisture Wicking Micro-Fleece Running Sport Gloves (Black)

    Moisture Wicking Micro-Fleece Running Gloves

    $12.95
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  • MEN’S PERFORMANCE ACTIVE WEAR RUNNING GLOVES

    Men’s Performance Active Wear Running Gloves

    $14.95
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Don’t let the weather hold you back! Urban Boundaries stocks a variety of quality and cost-effective cold weather running gear to keep you knocking down the miles, even when the weather gets chilly. We know you want to look good, and have the form and function of the high end labels but without the marked up price. We have worked hard to make sure our discount cold weather running gear meets our exacting standards, and our customers’, without breaking the bank.

Urban Boundaries is proud to offer men’s and women’s running gear that uses moisture wicking fabric that’s designed to pull moisture away from the skin. When running in the winter, though it is cold, you still sweat which can be uncomfortable with all of the layers of clothing on. Moisture wicking fabric draws that perspiration off of the skin and out to the exterior of the material. It’s much easier for that moisture to evaporate when it is not trapped between the garment and the skin.

Other benefits include the prevention of hypothermia. In low temperatures, it’s dangerous for sweat to collect on the skin because it can cool or even freeze on the skin. Not only is it uncomfortable, it can cause illness and hypothermia, something that is largely avoided with the technology of moisture wicking.

It also helps regulate body temperature and it is easy to wash and care for. We have all of your high-quality moisture wicking running gear essentials at competitive prices!

winter running

After a long, hot summer, it’s finally the time of year when the temperatures start to drop. The world doesn’t stop, however, and you still need to find a way to get your miles in regardless of the increasing cold. The main concerns in hot weather are to stay hydrated and effectively cool off. You wear less clothing to let the heat escape and make sure to keep plenty of fluids on hand. It is generally acceptable to work up a good sweat and have a layer of perspiration keeping your body temps reasonable. Concerns in the cold are, of course, the opposite. You want to keep moisture from accumulating too much and retain heat as much as possible. It is common knowledge that the human body doesn’t react well to wet and cold at the same time. The immune system works overtime to keep body temperature from dropping to an unhealthy level, so the defenses are lowered against airborne diseases and frostbite. The following tips are ways to run safely and effectively after the leaves have fallen and snow becomes an issue:

  •  Warm-up and stretch. You should always stretch and warm up for a run in any weather, but this is especially true in the cold. This will get the blood circulating and keep you protected against the initial stretch of cold and the sudden temperature change that occurs when you move from the warmth of your home to the outside. It also helps with the stiffening of the joints.
  •  Consider your intake. For a winter run, you may need to up your pre-run meal to provide your body with the fuel it needs for the added exertion of the cold. That isn’t to say you should abandon your diet and have a four-course breakfast, but maybe add a bowl of oatmeal to that sliced apple you have for breakfast.
  • Cover yourself in Cold Weather Running Gear. This perhaps goes without saying, but some make the mistake of presuming that physical activity will provide the body heat needed to overcome the cold. This may be true in “chilly” weather–e.g. fifty degrees or so–but not when the temps run below the thirties. A general rule of thumb is to add a layer for even ten degrees the temperature drops past fifty, meaning at least two layers of warm fabrics are necessary for anything below forty. Keep in mind that running will generate some heat, so you don’t need to grab an overcoat or parka, but you want to make sure your core is covered by at least two items like a longsleeve shirt and a vest. The extremities–head, hands, and feet–are very important, especially the feet, since you may be stepping repeatedly in the snow. You’ll want to invest in a good pair of socks, some airtight shoes, and a hat and gloves made with moisture-wicking fabrics.
  • Run with friends. The buddy system never fails. In the off chance that conditions suddenly become extreme or hypothermia becomes an issue, you want someone around who can get you to safety. This is especially important if your running location is off-road and away from civilization.
  • Manage perspiration. We mentioned moisture-wicking fabrics in the section about covering yourself above. It is advisable to use moisture-wicking fabrics for any bottom layer clothing when running in the winter. That’s hats, gloves, shirts, and bottoms. These fabrics pull moisture away from the skin and provide protection against the chills that lead to frostbite and hypothermia, keeping you safe and dry.
  • There is a such thing as “too cold to run”. If the temperatures approach zero and/or the snow conditions aren’t conducive to walking, there’s no shame in staying in and seeking your cardio by other means. You should always be checking the weather to see if the conditions are subject to an unfavorable change before embarking on foot. Your physical safety should always be more important than your daily routine.

That’s it! you’re ready to hit the ground running this winter! Check out our winter running gear!